Salmon Poke Bowl

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salmon-poke-bowl

Salmon Poke Bowl

Lately I’ve been really getting into the Poke Bowls (pronounced "Poh-keh"), but of course, with my own twist. Poke is an old traditional Hawaiian staple. It is super healthy, combines a multitude of contrasting flavors and textures, and not complicated to make. For my Poke bowl, I pick the best ingredients and components, select excellent fresh fish and then arrange everything in a visually attractive way but the only thing that is cooked are the noodles. In my version there are cold soba noodles which take 6 minutes to cook. The star of the dish is of course, the fish. I used a wild caught King salmon which has buttery tender flesh, delicate structure and subtle taste. I picked it up at my neighborhood market Jubilee. Most likely, these days, you can find sashimi grade salmon labeled as sake or ahi tuna in a specialty fish or gourmet market around where you live, if not, try Amazon! Most important, the fish has to be fresh, not smell like a fish and consumed as soon as possible. For garnish I chose crunchy watermelon radish with its fuchsia interior, Persian cucumber, pickled ginger to add a bit of zest, sesame seeds, dry seaweed that literally dissolves on your tongue for a hint of exotic flavor, and briny salmon roe that decadently bursts with every bite.  Tiny thin slices of red chili pepper and few drops of sriracha in the sauce tantalize your palate in that playful way to make you want to savor each mouthful.

I like Asian influence and the juxtaposition it presents when incorporated various cuisines. Thus I frequently experiment with it as is also the case with my Poke. My re-imagined Poke is not your traditional Hawaiian classic but it sure started there.

This is a phenomenal light and flavorful dish that can be used either for lunch or dinner and my entire family loves it.
Make your own Poke Bowl and share the flavor combinations you put together with me on the blog. Enjoy!

salmon-poke-bowl-ingredients

Ingredients: king salmon, soba noodles, salmon roe, carrot, Persian cucumber, watermelon radish, red jalapeño or chili pepper, scallions, pickled ginger, micro greens, lime, roasted seaweed sushinori, sesame seeds.

For the sauce: reduced sodium miso, rice vinegar, sesame oil, sriracha.

salmon-poke-bowl-shave-carrot

Peel the carrots, discard the peelings. Place the carrot flat onto a cutting board and using a vegetable peeler make thin long ribbons, starting at the base of the carrot.

salmon-poke-bowl-slice-carrot-thinly

Cut the ribbons into thin strips lengthwise.

salmon-poke-bowl-carrot-strips

It is a tedious task, but I still like doing it that way.  The thin raw carrot strips resemble noodles in shape and compliment salmon well. If short on time, get a smaller variety of carrots, about 5 inches or so long and peel it into thin ribbons skipping the step of making long strips.

salmon-poke-bowl-peel-watermelon-radish

Peel the pale-green outer skin of watermelon radish.

salmon-poke-bowl-slicing-radish

Slice it thinly on the mandolin or with a knife.

salmon-poke-bowl-vivi-steals-radish

Slice red chili and Persian cucumber thinly. Set all the vegetables aside.

salmon-poke-bowl-remove-bones

Remove the bones with your fingers or tweezers.

salmon-poke-bowl-remove-skin-from-fishsalmon-poke-bowl-dicing-salmon

Place salmon skin-side down. Carefully insert the knife (sharp, please! or ask your fishmonger to do it for you) at one end of the fillet between the skin and the flesh. Slowly but confidently wiggle the knife along the fillet by pulling the freed skin until the fresh is completely off. Dice salmon into 3/4- inch cubes.

salmon-poke-bowl-sauce

For the soba noodle sauce, I keep things simple- miso paste, rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil and spicy sriracha whisked into savory solution.

salmon-poke-bowl-soba-noodles-ingredients

Cook noodles according to instructions (usually 6 minutes in boiling water). Run under cold water to stop from cooking, then drain in colander. Combine with the sauce.

salmon-poke-bowl-soy-sauce

King salmon has this incredible buttery flesh that tastes divine. Soft yet firm, it melts in your mouth. I add very few basic ingredients to compliment the fish like soy sauce and toasted sesame oil.

salmon-poke-bowl-spoon-salmon-over-noodles

Divide soba noodles among serving bowls and top each with equal amount of salmon cubes. Garnish the bowls with the rest of ingredients- thinly sliced cucumber, radish, carrot strips, micro greens and salmon roe.

salmon-poke-bowl-cutting-roasted-seaweed

Sprinkle with thinly sliced chili, scallions, sesame seeds, then cut dry seaweed sushinory over each bowl into thin strips.

salmon-poke-bowl

Add lime wedges and serve with sesame seeds and thinly sliced jalapeño/or chili on a side for additional crunch and spice element to some:).

salmon-poke-bowl-place-salmon-over-noodlessalmon-poke-bowl-cut-seaweed-over-salmon

This is the same recipe but plated differently.

salmon-poke-bowl-garnishing-with-salmon-roe

Salmon roe is relatively inexpensive yet adds so much character to these poke bowls. It is slightly salty with a delicate taste.

salmon-poke-bowl-pickled-ginger

Julienned marinated ginger is totally optional, it has a lovely kick of acidity and a pretty pink color.

salmon-poke-bowl

If you can't find micro greens at the store, cilantro is a great alternative. Don't chop it, serve it whole, few sprigs will be great!

salmon-poke-bowl

For those who like beers, try poke with Japanese Asahi Dry- my personal favorite!

salmon-poke-bowl-foodblogger-svitlana-flom

 

 

 

 

Bon Appétit!
Svitlana

Salmon Poke Bowl

recipe details

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. soba noodles, cooked according to packaging instructions
For the salmon
  • 1 lb. wild king salmon, skinned and cut into ¾-inch cubes
  • soy sauce
  • toasted sesame oil
For the garnishing
  • 6 oz. salmon roe
  • 2 small carrots, cut into ribbons, then thin strips
  • 1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced
  • 1 small watermelon radish, peeled, thinly sliced
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 long red chili pepper, thinly sliced
  • pickled ginger (optional), to taste
  • sesame seeds, to taste
  • dry seaweed sushinori, cut into thin strips, to taste
  • lime, quartered
  • micro greens or cilantro
For the sauce
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium miso paste
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1/2-1 teaspoon sriracha sauce
  • 3 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

Directions

  1. For the noodles: Cook noodles according to instructions (usually 6 minutes in boiling water). Run under cold water to stop from cooking, then drain in colander. In a bowl large enough to fit cooked noodles, combine miso paste, sriracha and vinegar. Pour in sesame oil in one stream and whisk the ingredients to blend into a sauce. Add noodles and mix well.
  2. For the garnishing: Peel the carrots, discard the peelings. Place the carrot flat onto a cutting board and using a vegetable peeler make thin long ribbons, starting at the base of the carrot. Cut the ribbons into thin strips lengthwise.
  3. Kitchen tip: It is a tedious task, and if short on time, get a smaller variety of carrots, about 5 inches or so long and peel it into thin ribbons skipping the step of making long strips.
  4. Peel the  watermelon radish. Slice it thinly on the mandolin or with a knife. Slice red chili and Persian cucumber thinly. Set all the vegetables aside.
  5. For the salmon: Remove the bones with your fingers or tweezers.  Dice salmon into 3/4- inch cubes. Transfer salmon cubes into a bowl and mix with soy sauce and sesame oil gently. Let it sit for 15 minutes at room temperature.
  6. To serve, divide soba noodles among serving bowls and top each with equal amount of salmon cubes. Garnish the bowls with the rest of ingredients- thinly sliced cucumber, radish, carrot strips, ginger, micro greens and salmon roe. Sprinkle with thinly sliced chili, scallions, sesame seeds, then cut dry seaweed sushinory over each bowl into thin strips. Serve with lime wedges and extra helping of sesame seeds and thinly sliced jalapeño/or chili on a side for additional crunch and spice element to some. Kitchen tip: If you can't find micro greens at the store, cilantro is a great alternative. Don't chop it, serve it whole, few sprigs will be great!
                                                 

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